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Home » Course Case Maps » Course Case Mapping For Marketing Management-II

Course Case Mapping For Marketing Management-II

IBSCDC's Course Case Map on Marketing Management II addresses such key marketing concepts as: the relevant product and sales promotion mix; designing effective sales promotion strategies, principles for evaluating effective personal selling; different tools of product promotion; what are the different pricing methods and what are the strategic perspectives behind each of the pricing strategy; the economics of pricing strategies; when does it make sense to go for direct marketing or for what kind of products does it make sense for adopting direct marketing approach; what are the different channels of marketing and when should they be used to have the highest marketing ROI; what it takes to sell effectively on-line?; how should brands (as opposed to products) be positioned and repositioned?; how should companies market their products/services globally?; what is the role of government in global marketing?; what is the signficance of rural marketing (especially in India)?; how to outsmart the competitors?; are there any best practices to oursmart the smartest competitors?; what are the ethical issues related to marketing? Having been tested in the most demanding MBA classrooms, all these case studies come with a rich focus and content depth.

Marketing Management-II Case Mapping

Chapter : Promotion Decisions

Chapter : Promotion Decisions

Detailed Syllabus: Concept of Communication and Promotion-mix – Communication Process – Audience – Objective – Designing the Measures – The Promotion Budget – The Promotion-mix – Evaluating the Promotion – Advertising Decisions – Publicity and Sales Promotion Objectives – Tools – Program Pre-testing – Implementing – Evaluating – Principles of Personnel Selling. (Kotler p 549) (Koshy p 464)
Session: 1
Key Concepts: Communication Process
Case Study: Coke’s Promotional Themes: Tailored for Times
Abstracts: For more than a century, Coke had been the most admiring brand with its unique advertising slogans and jingling musical themes, capturing the moods of consumers in an innovative way. In 2000, its new theme ‘Coca-Cola Enjoy’ conveyed that the brand added magical touch to the special moments of life by appealing that it is the most affordable brand to fulfill the simple pleasures of life. Its product promotional measures made it a most valuable brand in the world valuing $70.45 billion by 2003. The case study provides insights about how Coke succeeded in the beverage industry by periodically upgrading its product promotional strategies and keeping the brand image afresh.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 17, “Designing and Managing Integrated Marketing”, of Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • The Perfect Message for the Perfect Moment”, HBR, Nov. 2005

Case Study: Mobile Phones: The Advent of a New Advertising Medium
Abstracts: Marketing in the new millennium is spearheading beyond the boundaries using innovative strategies and methods in communicating the benefits of product/ service of a company’s offerings. Marketers realised that by 2008, the usage of mobile phones reached $2 billion in the world with a huge market base. Realising the potential of mobile phone advertising, marketers are using short messages as advertisement platforms to reach out to the customers. The case study presents the new trends in marketing and product promotion strategies and opportunities in marketing communication through mobile phone as an affective medium.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 17, “Designing and Managing Integrated Marketing”, of Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Marketing Promotions”, HBS Note (9-506-028)
  • Trade Promotion: Essential To Selling Through Resellers”, Sloan Management Review, Fall 1999
Session: 2
Key Concepts: Tools of Product Promotion
Case Study: De Beers: The Right Hand Ring Campaign
Abstracts: De Beers, a diamond mining giant spent huge sums on product promotion by focusing on bridal category events like marriage, engagements, wedding anniversaries and other emotional events that touch human lives. De Beers launched a novel concept called ‘Right hand Ring’ promoted in four styles – modern vintage, contemporary, floral and romantic.The case study helps in understanding various tools in product promotion like print, television, online and other forms of product promotion methods. It also highlights how its promotional tools indirectly influenced the retail sales of diamonds, without being directly involved in retail sales.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 17, “Designing and Managing Integrated Marketing”, of Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
Session: 3
Key Concepts: Publicity and Sales Promotion
Case Study: Dubai Duty Free: Promotion and Expansion
Abstracts: The case study highlights the aggressive sales promotion strategies of Dubai Duty Free (DDF) which included international sporting events, television campaigns and raffles for luxury passenger cars and million dollar prizes. The case describes how the promotional strategies of DDF created an ultimate shopping experience and the synergies of operations between the government, its airport authorities and airlines, contributed to the economic development of the nation.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 17, “Designing and Managing Integrated Marketing”, Topic “Characteristics of the Marketing Communications Mix”, page 476 of Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Channel Management”, HBS Note
  • Winning the Multi-Channel Challenge”, Booz, Allen & Hamilton
  • Channel Structure and Strategic Choice in Distribution Channels”, Journal of Management Research, Aug. 2007
Session: 4
Key Concepts: Managing Personal Communi- cations: Word of Mouth Marketing
Case Study: P&G’s Tremor – Reinventing Marketing by Word of Mouth
Abstracts: With the decreasing influence of the conventional marketing media, it had become more and more difficult for the marketers to reach the target consumer groups with their marketing message. But, people still listened and believed what other people said, especially those they knew and trusted. The ‘word of mouth’ marketing has been in existence for a very long time. This case analyses the Word Of Mouth (WOM) marketing communication channel adopted by Procter & Gamble (P&G). P&G created a marketing division called ‘Tremor’ in 2001, tapping the American teenagers’ gossip factor.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 19, “Managing Personal Communications: Direct and Interactive Marketing, Word of Mouth, and Personal Selling”, of Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al

Chapter : Pricing Decisions

Chapter : Product Design

Detailed Syllabus: Internal and External Factors Affecting Pricing Decisions – Pricing Objectives – Pricing Approaches – Cost-based Pricing – Buyer-based Pricing – Competition- based Pricing – New Product Pricing Strategies – Product-mix Pricing Strategies – Price Adjustment Strategies – Price Changes. (Kotler page 458)
Session: 5
Key Concepts: Factors in Setting Pricing Policy
Case Study: The Dilemma of Discounts: GM’s Bid for Market Share
Abstracts: After the gulf-crisis, the dominance of US automobile industry had weakened due to the intense competition from Asian automakers, in particular, Japanese, with their fuel-efficient and quality products in the country. In order to withstand competition, boost sales volumes, clear-up inventories and meet pension obligations the US automakers added a component called ‘discounts’ to sustain foreign competition. The case study highlights the factors that influenced General Motors, to revamp its pricing strategies in order to withstand mounting pressure from foreign automakers and meet its pension obligations.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 14, “Developing Pricing Strategies and Programs”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Pricing and the Psychology of Consumption”, HBR, Sept. 2002
  • "How Do You Know When The Price is Right”, HBR, Sept–Oct 1995
  • "Pricing Metrics and Concepts”, Darden Business Publishing (Note)(UVA-M-0723)
  • Principles of Pricing”, HBS Note (9-506-021)
  • Sustaining Value”, HBS Note (9-501-045)
Session: 6
Key Concepts: Pricing Objectives
Case Study: ASDA: Betting on Low Prices?
Abstracts: The key marketing strategy of ASDA – a division of Wal-Mart – is based on price with an aim of offering best value to the customers. Its policy of Every Day Low Prices (EDLP) is the key success factor of its marketing strategies by undercutting competitor prices by 10%–15%. The case study provides an understanding about the pricing strategies of ASDA which derives profits from increased volume of sales rather than margin improvement.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 14, “Developing Pricing Strategies and Programs”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • In Praise of Honest Pricing”, Sloan Management Review, Fall 2003
  • "Bringing Discipline to Pricing”, McKinsey Quarterly 2000
  • "Cost Transparency: The Net’s Real Threat To Prices and Brands”, HBR, Mar.–Apr. 2000
  • "Making Money With Proactive Pricing”, HBR, Nov.–Dec. 1984
  • "Managing Price, Gaining Profit”, HBR, Sept.–Oct. 1992
  • "Mind Your Pricing Cues”, HBR, Sept. 2003
Session: 7
Key Concepts: Promotional Pricing
Case Study: Apple iPhone Price Cut: Is it a Right Strategy?
Abstracts: Steve Jobs, CEO Apple was quite happy with the customer satisfaction scores of Apple iPhone which marked higher than any of its products in 2007. He considered iPhone a breakthrough product in the industry and wanted to make the product affordable to more customers.The case study pinpoints the promotional pricing strategies of Apple iPhone launched in June 2007, with a price tag of $599 initially and quickly slashing the price of 8 gigabyte storage iPhone from $599 to $399 sparking off a controversy in the mobile phone industry.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 14, “Developing Pricing Strategies and Programs”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • No Insult Pricing and Promotions”, A T Kearney
  • Note on Behavioral Pricing”, HBS Note (9-599-114)
  • Note On Pricing Strategies for Industrial Products”, HBS Note (9-582-124)
Session: 8
Key Concepts: Price Adjustment Strategies to Dominate the Markets/ Price Wars
Case Study: The Price War: Netflix vs Blockbuster
Abstracts: The case study highlights the price wars between two online DVD rental firms, Netflix and Blockbuster, resulting in keeping potential new players at bay. The case also debates on the pricing strategies of Netflix and the counteracts of Blockbuster ensuing dwindling profits of the companies.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 14, “Developing Pricing Strategies and Programs”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Pricing Policies for New Products”, HBR, Nov-Dec 1976
  • "Pricing New Products”, McKinsey Quarterly, 2003
  • "The Right Mix for a Pricing Fix”, s+b
  • Finding New Answers to the Pricing Question”, A T Kearney

Chapter : Direct and Online Marketing

Chapter : Direct and Online Marketing

Detailed Syllabus: Growth of direct Marketing – Customer database and direct marketing – Channels of direct marketing – online marketing – Internet and E-commerce.
Session: 9
Key Concepts: Dynamics of Direct Marketing
Case Study: Dell’s Business Model: Is it Time to Reinvent?
Abstracts: Michael Dell was quiet unhappy with the criticism of its direct business model and replied, ‘No, the sky is not falling at Dell. We failed to meet our expectations, which were high.’ Dell’s missing financial revenue projections during financial year 2005–2006 raised concerns about the models viability in future in the global PC industry.The case study presents the dynamics of Dell’s direct selling model which enabled the brand to eventually become a leader in the global PC industry. It also provides a dilemma of limitations of the model and the necessity of adopting changes to penetrate into the potential consumer markets.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 19, “Managing Personal Communications: Direct and Interactive Marketing, Word of Mouth, and Personal Selling”, of Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Contextual Marketing: The Real Business of the Internet”, HBR, Nov–Dec 2000

Case Study: Avon: Direct Selling in China
Abstracts: David Mc Connell, founder of Avon, a manufacturer of cosmetics and related products stated in a 1903 publication that his ambition was to produce a line of goods superior to any other...and take these goods through canvassing agents from the laboratory to the consumer. But many fraudulent practices during late 1990s led to imposing ban on direct selling practices in China. But by 2005 China again opened its doors for direct selling products with improved marketing practices. The case study provides insights into the direct selling methods of Avon and its opportunities in the Chinese cosmetic products industry.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 19, “Managing Personal Communications: Direct and Interactive Marketing, Word of Mouth, and Personal Selling”, of Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • "How To Acquire Customers on the Web”, HBR, May–June 2000

Session: 10
Key Concepts: Channels of Marketing (Koshy p 408)
Case Study: Netflix Prize 2009: Neuro-Marketing Research for Online Shoppers
Abstracts: Conventional retailing is becoming a passé; online retailing is the new mantra of the 21st century’s business environment. Physical store retailers are outsourcing their online business activities to digital service agencies to dwell in the lore of online trading. Companies are in a haste to make every visit of the consumer into a sales conversion. To accomplish this target they are coming up with analytical, neruomartketing techniques and implementing them to jot down cutting edge business formulae. Netflix Prize 2009 is a new method where web analytics use a unique algorithm to floor the visitor with intelligent advices, which eventually leads to the enhancement of the company’s business The case study deals with the use of Web analytics and Neuromarketing techniques in new age marketing research methodologies. It emphasises the significance of these techniques in recording the consumer behavior online as well as offline. Holistically, it focuses on whether these techniques confined to only to e commerce or do they come in aid for the offline business prospects as well.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 15, “Designing and Managing Integrated Marketing Channels”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Strategy And The Internet”, HBR, March 2001
  • "E-commerce: The Customer Reigns Supreme and So Can Your Business”, HBR OnPoint Collection
  • The Internet and the International Marketing”, Sloan Management Review, Spring 1996
  • "Web Sales With a Human Touch”, s+b
Session: 11
Key Concepts: Online Marketing
Case Study: Acquire and Ascend: The eBookers Way
Abstracts: The case study narrates the success story of ebookers.com, an earliest on-line travel agency that weathered several downturns. It also explains the acquisition strategies adopted by the company as a part of expansion and growth of business.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 19, “Managing Personal Communications: Direct and Interactive Marketing, Word of Mouth, and Personal Selling”, of Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Winning The Online Consumer 2.0", BCG, Feb 2001
  • "E-coms and Their Marketing Strategies”, Business Horizons, Sept–Oct 2002
  • "Setting The Right E-Price”, HBR OnPoint Collection
Session: 12
Key Concepts: E-Commerce Markets
Case Study: Emergence of China in the Global e-Commerce Market (B): Alibaba.com ’s Surge
Abstracts: Established in June 1999, Alibaba.com soon became a global leader in Business-to-Business (B2B) e-commerce, making marketing a delightful way for millions of buyers and suppliers around the world. Its business and operational patterns helped the firm to become the highest market valued firm and enabled the company to be listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange in November 2007. The case study focuses on the dynamics of Chinese B2B e-commerce market and the e-commerce business methodology of Alibaba business group in China. The case analyses its global expansion strategies and its skills in handling diverse needs of domestic (Chinese) and foreign customers.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 15, “Designing and Managing Integrated Marketing Channels”, Topic ‘E-commerce Marketing Practices’ page 424, Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • How Companies Are Marketing Online”, McKinsey Global Survey
  • Uncovering Patterns in Cyber Shopping”, California Management Review, Summer 2001
  • "A Moving Target: The Mobile Commerce Customer”, Sloan Management Review, Spring 2001

Chapter : Brand Decisions

Chapter : Brand Decisions

Detailed Syllabus: Brand, Packaging and Labeling Decisions and product Decisions with Emphasis on e-branding. Kotler pages 404–420
Session: 13
Key Concepts: Brand Decision: To Brand or Not to Brand?
Case Study: Branding: The Asian Dilemma
Abstracts: The case study was primarily written to understand the dilemma of branding in Asian Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) from being anonymous suppliers to established brands in the markets. It further debates the constraints of Asian manufacturers while creating international brands.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 10, “Creating Brand Equity”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
Session: 14
Key Concepts: Brand Repositioning
Case Study: Hindustan Unilever Limited’s Rexona: Repositioning ‘Rexona’ Deodorant
Abstracts: Unilever’s INR 55 billion ($1.36 billion) brand – Rexona, spans across 90 markets worldwide commanding 14.5% share of the global deodorant market. In India, as one of the pioneer brands of Hindustan Unilever Limited (HUL), Rexona was worth INR 1.78 billion in 2006. With an annual growth rate of 28%, Rexona continued to compete as one of the core brands in HUL’s brand portfolio.The case discusses the challenges faced by the popular brand, despite creating a market which was virtually non-existent in India. The case inculcates various dimensions of brand positioning and the challenges of repositioning a deodorant brand.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 11, “Crafting the Brand Positioning”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al

Case Study: C&C’s ‘ Bulmers’ and ‘Magners’ Brand: The Irish Drinks Beverage Company’s Brand Repositioning Strategies
Abstracts: The case study explains the repositioning of Cantrell and Cochrane’s (C&C’s) ‘Bulmer’, a low-cost cider drink to an improved premium product in the Irish beverage market. The case delves into how the success of ‘Bulmer’ encouraged the brand to launch in the UK cider market under the brand name of ‘Magners’ with various promotional strategies.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 11, “Crafting the Brand Positioning”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
Session: 15
Key Concepts: Packaging Decisions
Case Study: Pringles – Combating the Launch of Lays Stax
Abstracts: Pringles the global market leader in the ‘potato crisps’ category in the US is facing a new threat. In late 2003, Frito Lays launched Lays Stax – a variety of potato crisps that closely resembles Pringles. Though people across the world are accustomed to the crunchy taste and the unique packaging of Pringles, Frito Lays, is offering an extensive range of flavours in the potato crisps segment. It also offers unique packaging and competitive pricing and enjoys a huge distribution network. Being a market leader in the potato chips market, Frito Lays is a formidable competitor. How can Pringles maintain its market share in the face of stiff competition from Frito Lays?
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 12, “Setting Product Strategy”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
Session: 16
Key Concepts: Labeling
Case Study: Private Labels in Europe: Potential Threats for Brands?
Abstracts: About 30 years ago in UK, private label products were perceived as cheap, brand copy and low-quality goods. Today, private label industry has grown to such an extent in Europe that it is worth over ¤100 billion. The growth of private label industry can largely be attributed to the fact that 79% of retail grocery market is held by top four retailers making it easier to own large spectrum of own labels. Brands developed by Wal-Mart, Target and others took away the market share of established brand businesses like Procter & Gamble, Unilever etc., especially in the Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) sector. The case study provides insights into the growth of private label market and its competitive advantage over established brands.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 12, “Setting Product Strategy”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • The New Appeal of Private Labels”, HBR, May–June 1999
  • Brands Vs Private Labels: Fighting To Win”, HBR, Jan–Feb 1996
  • When Do Private Labels Succeed”, Sloan Management Review, Summer 1993

Chapter : Global Marketing

Chapter : Global Marketing

Detailed Syllabus: Economics of International Marketing – Global Markets Export Marketing Strategies – Government Support Kotler pages 365–392
Session: 17
Key Concepts: Economics of International Marketing
Case Study: Harry Potter: Global Marketing Strategies
Abstracts: The sales of J.K Rowling’s Harry Potter, crossed 270 million worldwide and the book was translated in 60 languages with a readership base in 130 countries by 2005. The case study brings out the success of Harry Potter’s global marketing strategies with word-of-mouth and viral marketing techniques apart from the story telling skills of Rowling.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 21, “Tapping into Global Markets”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • The Globalization of Markets”, HBR, May–June 1983
  • "Can You Standardize Multinational Marketing”, HBR, Nov–Dec 1968
Session: 18
Key Concepts: Global Markets
Case Study: Nokia – Global Market Share 40%; US Market Share 10%: Competitive Strategies
Abstracts: The case study outlines the structure of US telecommunication industry and the obstacles Nokia faced in finding a foothold in marketplace. It further debates the revolutionary trends in mobile hand sets industry and the reasons for Nokia’s failure despite achieving a global market share of 40%.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 21, “Tapping into Global Markets”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Customizing Global Marketing”, HBR, May–June 1986

Case Study: Mahindra & Mahindra (B): An Emerging Global Giant?
Abstracts: With the formidable success of Mahindra & Mahindra‘s (M&M’s) Scorpio – a Sport Utility Vehicle (SUV) – in India, the company intends to enter overseas markets. However automobile enthusiasts wonder whether M&M can sustain the diverse product portfolio and competition on global scale.
The case study analyses the characteristics of firms of emerging economies and the strategies adopted by them to sustain the competition and challenges in the global automobile industry.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 21, “Tapping into Global Markets”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • "Seven Rules of International Distribution”, HBR, Nov–Dec 2000
Session: 19
Key Concepts: Strategies of Export Marketing
Case Study: Automobiles: Made in China, Sold in America?
Abstracts: Chery Automobile (Chery), a state-owned enterprise, based at Wuhu, in the Anhui Province of China announced to export 250,000 passenger cars to US in 2007 in a joint venture with Malcolm Bricklin’s Visionary Vehicles. The case focuses on the dynamics of Chinese automobile market and its expansion strategies to US and various other nations like Malaysia, Syria and Kuwait in exporting passenger cars and establishing assembly plants in Venezuela and Pakistan. The case also ponders on whether Chery would gain a market foothold in US where automobile industry reached a maturity stage.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 21, “Tapping into Global Markets”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
Session: 20
Key Concepts: Role of Government in Global Marketing
Case Study: Honda in China: Government Regulations and Firm‘s Strategy
Abstracts: Prior to China’s entry into World Trade Organization (WTO), its government imposed stringent controls, heavy tariffs on imported automobiles and its components. But after its entry into WTO in 2001, it put an end to its heavy taxation on imported cars to boost domestic manufacturing capabilities and quality aspects. The case focuses on government’s interference in business environment by means of regulations and laws that affect corporate strategies. The case also triggers a dilemma whether a government should interfere in the market or leave it to the dynamic play of market forces.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 21, “Tapping into Global Markets”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al

Case Study: The US Steel Industry and the Tariff Policy of Bush
Abstracts: The case study presents the problems in US Steel industry such as price instability, overcapacity and high legacy costs and intervention of President George W. Bush by initiating a 3-year ‘safeguard’ measure on steel imports. It explains how government can impose tariffs to safeguard domestic industry and the implications thereof in the light of international trade rules.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 21, “Tapping into Global Markets”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al

Chapter : Rural marketing Strategic Planning and the Marketing Process (6)

Chapter : Rural marketing Strategic Planning and the Marketing Process (6)

Detailed Syllabus: The Strategic Planning Process: Defining the Company Mission, Objectives and Roles – The Corporate SWOT – Designing the Business Portfolio – Planning Functional Strategies – Developing a marketing plan Innovation, The Marketing Management Process: Target Consumers – Developing the Marketing Mix – Managing the Marketing EffortKotler pages 63–92
Session: 21
Key Concepts: Rural Marketing
Case Study: Rural Marketing in India: Retailing through Microfinance Institutions
Abstracts: This case study primarily deals with the growing corporate-MFI partnerships, for creating distribution channel in rural areas of India. Management guru, C.K. Prahalad has been insisting that companies, which operate at the bottom of the pyramid, will witness future rewards and growth. Of late, catering to the strata of people present at the low-income levels and those of the rural areas has indeed become mainstay for many companies. On top of this, the vast opportunities opened up by rural areas – the increasing purchasing power of rural consumers, growing consumption levels, media penetration into rural areas, etc., are alluring companies towards rural markets. Companies of all kinds, like Hindustan Unilever Limited, Coca-Cola, Godrej, Nokia, Bharti Airtel, Bajaj Allianz, etc., are catering to rural markets by customising their offerings. However, since the rural areas are highly scattered and less densely populated, companies are finding it difficult to reach the Indian hinterlands, with the existing distribution channels. As a result, they began to fine-tune the distribution networks and in this process tied-up with Microfinance Institutions (MFIs), which have a strong social network. MFIs, acting as distributors, are providing many other benefits to the companies like, enhancing brand visibility in rural areas, tapping more rural consumers, saving distribution costs, etc. However, can the social mission of MFIs be aligned with profit objective of companies? Question also arises about the sustainability of corporate-MFI partnerships.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 1, “Defining Marketing for the 21st Century”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Multi-Channel Shopping: Channel Use Among Rural Consumers” , International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, Vol4, No.6, 2006
  • "The Great Indian Retail Story”, E&Y ”Serving The Low Income Consumer: How To Tackle This Mostly Ignored Market”, A T Kearney
  • Retail In India: Getting Organized To Drive Growth”, CII-A T Kearney Report
Session: 22
Key Concepts: Strategic Planning
Case Study: Telstra, The Australian Telecommunications Company: CEO Sol Trujillo’s ‘Transformational’ Strategic Plan
Abstracts: Telstra, an Australian local telecom marketer after years of dominance lost market share due to intense competition from other mobile operators. To counter competition, the government planned to privatise the company and appointed Solomon Trujillo as the CEO of Telstra. The case study debates whether the strategic plan of action announced by Solomon Trujillo would bring its lost glory amidst intense competitive pressures in the telecom industry.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 2, “Developing Marketing Strategies and Plans”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Uses and Misuses of Strategic Planning”, HBR, Jan–Feb 1986
  • The Fall and Rise of Strategic Planning”, HBR, Jan–Feb 1994
  • Discovery Driven Planning”, HBR, July–August 1995
  • Portfolio Techniques for Strategic Planning”, Darden Business Publishing (Note) (UVA – BP-0292)
Session: 23
Key Concepts: Corporate SWOT
Case Study: Ford’s ‘Drive One’ Campaign: Can Alan Mulally Drive Through the Trough?
Abstracts: The case study highlights the challenges ahead for Alan Mulally, Ford’s new CEO, to bring the crumbling Ford back on track. Toyota Motors in 2008, snatched its long retained fortress of No.2 position and pushed Ford to 3rd position in total sales. While Ford is familiar for its ‘mass production’ and ‘assembly-line manufacturing’ techniques with a century long automobile history, Toyota’s modern ways of ‘lean manufacturing’ brought Fordist ways almost to a grinding halt. Ford’s troubles in the new millennium intensified with mounting pension and healthcare obligations, critical customer perception, inadequate R&D spending, overcapacity, decline in market share and profit margins in the new millennium.The case encompasses the challenges being faced by Ford Motors with measures initiated to bring the historical automaker back on track. It provides scope for analysing the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of Ford’s internal and external environments in the light of changing trends in the ever-rising gasoline prices during 2008 and a shift in consumer behaviour towards more compact and fuel-efficient cars.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 2, “Developing Marketing Strategies and Plans”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Corporate Imagination and Expeditionary Marketing”, HBR, July–August 1991
  • "Crafting Strategy”, HBR, July–August 1987
  • "Discover Your Product’s Hidden Potential”, HBR, May-June 1996
  • "Marketing Promotions”, HBS Note (9-506-028)

Chapter : Creating Competitive Advantage

Chapter : Creating Competitive Advantage

Detailed Syllabus: Competitor Analysis – Identifying the Company’s competitors – Determining Competitor’s Objectives – Identifying the Competitor’s Strengths and Weaknesses – Estimating Competitor’s Reaction Patterns – Selecting Competitors to Attack and Avoid
Session: 24
Key Concepts: Industry Pattern of Competition
Case Study: Competition in China’s Luxury Car Market
Abstracts: With US and European automobile markets getting saturated, automakers around the world started shifting their focus to explore opportunities in emerging economies, particularly on Chinese markets for growth. The case study presents the growing competition in Chinese automobile industry and the transforming buying behaviour of new generation Chinese coupled with supportive government policies for industrial growth.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 9, “Dealing with Competition”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Customer Value Propositions in Business Markets”, HBR, March 2006
  • "Creating Competitive Advantage”, HBS Note (9-798-062)
  • Note on Sources of Competitive Advantage”, HBS Note (9-387-024)
  • Business Marketing: Understand What Customers Value”, HBR, Nov–Dec 1998
Session: 25
Key Concepts: Competitor Analysis
Case Study: De Beers’ Corporate Transformation: The Competitive Pressures
Abstracts: For most of the 20th century De Beers sold 85%–90% of the diamonds mined worldwide. But with the indictment against the company for price fixing on industrial diamonds, its years of dominance ended with the company abandoning its older ways. The case study provides an understanding about the competitive landscape of the global diamond industry. DeBeers’ which faced cyclical pressures along with severe competition from new entrants like Lev Leviev Group, Rio Tinto Limited, BHP Biliton, Beny Steinmetz, Dan Gertler, etc., felt the need to make its presence felt in activities from mining, to polishing diamonds to retailing segments in order to take on its rivals head-on.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 9, “Dealing with Competition”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • How Strategy Shapes Structure”, HBR, Sept 2009
Session: 26
Key Concepts: Selection of Competitors to Attack and to Avoid
Case Study: Mattel: Competitive Strategies in the US
Abstracts: Mattel – the top player in US toys industry with Barbie as its flagship brand – was faced with falling market share and passing through troubled waters during 2003 with mounting competition from rivals like MGA, Hasbro, LeapFrog, Jakks and so on. The case encompasses the changing landscape of global toy industry. It also highlights the competitive threats faced by Mattel and the strategies chalked out by the company in tackling the growing competition in the US toy industry.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 9, “Dealing with Competition”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • “Hardball: Five Killer Strategies For Trouncing the Competition”, HBR, April 2004
  • "Market Analysis”, HBS Note (9-576-056)

Chapter : Competitive Strategies

Chapter : Competitive Strategies

Detailed Syllabus: Competitive Positions – Leader Strategies – Challenger Strategies – market-follower Strategies – Niche Strategies – Balancing Customer and Competition Orientations, competitive arena mapping.
Session: 27
Key Concepts: Designing Competitive Strategies
Case Study: Samsung vs LG: Similar Goals, Dissimilar Strategies
Abstracts: By the end of the fiscal year 2004, Samsung, the largest South Korean conglomerate, reported a profit of $10 billion, while its global and domestic competitor LG (LG Electronics) could make $1.5 billion. LG, which was a late entrant to the industry, intends to emerge as a strong international brand in the footsteps of Samsung. However, LG is considered to be a laggard in the consumer electronics industry with its short product life-cycles and ever changing technologies.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 9, "Dealing with Competition", of "Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective", Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • "How Sustainable Is Your Competitive Advantage", California Management Review, Spring 1992
  • "Gaining Strategic Marketing Advantage", Business Horizons, Sept–Oct, 1988
  • "Proven Strategies for New Market Mastery", Business Horizons, May–June 2002
  • "Masterly Marketing", HBR OnPoint Collection
Session: 28
Key Concepts: Market Follower Strategies
Case Study: Samsung Electronics in 2005
Abstracts: The case study highlights how a market follower company like Samsung Electronics transformed and projected itself as a leading global electronics manufacturer within a span of 10 years. It details out how the company’s investment decisions in R&D, even during the times of Asian Financial Crisis helped the company to achieve growth and become a market technology leader in the industry.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 9, “Dealing with Competition”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Avatar Based Marketing”, HBR, June 2006
  • "Competitive Positioning”, HBS Note (9-794-108)
  • Customer Intimacy and Other Value Disciplines”, HBR, Jan–Feb 1993
  • "Combining Corporate and Marketing Strategy for Global Competitiveness”, Marketing Intelligence & Planning
  • Making the Perfect Marketer”, s+b
Session: 29
Key Concepts: Niche Marketing Strategies
Case Study: Virgin Atlantic’s Business- Class-only Airline: Emerging Threat to Niche Air Carriers?
Abstracts: In June 2007, Virgin Atlantic – Britain’s second largest long haul airline and the third largest European carrier over the North Atlantic – marked its entry into Business Class Only (BCO) on the transatlantic route. Its participation in New York – London BCO market posed direct competition to small niche carriers Eos, MAX Jet, Silverjet, and L’Avion on the route. Even though Virgin Atlantic offered attractive discounts up to 40%, the walk-up fares of these small BCO carriers typically began below Virgin Atlantic’s discounted fares. The case study offers the dynamics of transatlantic aviation market and the lucrative facets of BCO market. It analyses the positioning of small niche carriers and the direct competition from established players in the BCO segment.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 8, “Identifying Market Segments and Targets”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Market Analysis”, HBS Note (9-576-056)
  • Making Your Marketing Strategy Work”, HBR, March–April 1984
  • "Marketing Strategy – An Overview”, HBS Note (9-500-005)
  • Marketing Strategy”, HBS Note (9-598-061)

Chapter : Responsibility and Ethics in Marketing

Chapter : Responsibility and Ethics in Marketing

Detailed Syllabus: Social Criticism and Responsibility of Marketing – Environmental Factors in Marketing Management Consumerism and Consumer Protection Law in India.
Session: 30
Key Concepts: Responsibility of Marketing
Case Study: ‘Global Vision 2010’: Toyota’s Strategic Initiatives
Abstracts: Jim Press, president and chief operating officer of Toyota Motors said, “While we’re happily cranking out more than 170,000 new vehicles each day globally, the cumulative number of vehicles we produce is taking a toll on the air we breathe …the roads we travel...and the safety of our families, country and planet.” The case encompasses Toyota’s efforts towards environmental protection as a part of its global vision and whether it would achieve its goal of becoming a leading automaker in the highly competitive automobile industry.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 22, “Managing A Holistic Marketing Organisation for the Long-run”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Doing Better At Doing Good: When, Why and How Consumers Respond to Corporate Social Initiatives”, California Management Review, Fall 2004
Session: 31
Key Concepts: Environmental Factors in Marketing Management
Case Study: US Bottled Water Industry Faces a New Frontier – Special Interest Groups
Abstracts: Between 1976 and 1994, US witnessed an alarming growth of over 900% per capita bottled water consumption. Reacting to this, environmentalists complained that bottled water is a non-environmental product as empty bottles add solid waste and pose threat to environment and society. Further, packaging and shipping these products result in draining out valuable natural resources and add to global warming. The case study highlights the impacts of special interest groups on a consumer business and the challenges posed to the bottled water industry in the light of opposition from environmentalists and special interest groups.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 22, “Managing A Holistic Marketing Organisation for the Long-run”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
Session: 32
Key Concepts: Marketing Ethics
Case Study: Tel Serv’s Franchisee Business: Riddledwith Regulators
Abstracts: Tel Serv’s (TS) is a public limited company in the business of telecom for about 50 years. Due to technical deficiencies in the mechanism, the billing was not proper and the company accrued huge loses due to this. Over billing and under billing were most common problems and this exploitation of state of affairs by employees and channel members resulted in a revenue loss of INR 100 crores over a sales base of INR 1,000 crores.
The case study presents the state of affairs at a public limited telecom company, Tel Serv and the misalignment of organisational channels. It raises debate on aspects like business ethics versus marketing ethics, ethics amongst channel partners versus operational issues, issues in shift of organisational orientation and personal issues of people involved in corporate fraud.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 22, “Managing A Holistic Marketing Organisation for the Long-run”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al

Case Study: Tata Tea’s Jaago Re! Campaign: The Social- Cause Marketing Initiatives and Long-term Branding Initiatives
Abstracts: This case study primarily deals with Tata Tea’s Social-Cause Marketing (SCM) initiative, Jaago Re! (Wake Up) campaign and can be used for debating and discussing on, at what stage of the brand life cycle, companies can take up SCM programmes. Tata Tea’s initial advertising campaigns primarily communicated the physical and functional aspects of the brand like packaging, freshness, taste, energy, etc. However, after attaining market leadership (in terms of volume share), Tata Tea elevated its communication efforts to the self-actualisation level and positioned itself as a catalyst for social-awakening, through Jaago Re! campaign. As part of this campaign, Tata Tea aired commercials on social problems – corruption, bad roads, irresponsible politicians, etc.
The case study deals with issues like: What has been the impact of this campaign on the brand’s image, customer loyalty, sales, etc.? Can this campaign help Tata Tea brand maintain its market leadership in the long run? Is there a need for prominent social problems to be endorsed by powerful brands to bring desired change?
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 22, “Good Cause, Good Business”, HBR, Sept–Oct 1999 Managing A Holistic Marketing Organisation for the Long-run”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al
  • Cause Related Marketing: How Generation Y Responds”, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, Vol 31, No.6, 2003
  • "Good Cause, Good Business”, HBR, Sept–Oct 1999
Session: 33
Key Concepts: Consumerism
Case Study: Business Confidence? Very High; Consumer Spending? Very Low: How to get the German Consumer to Spend More?
Abstracts: In June 2006, Information and Forschung (Ifo) Institute’s Business Climate Index, a key indicator of Business Confidence in German Economy reached 15-year high, when it rose by 1.1 points to 106.8 as against 105.7 in May 2006. Unlike Americans, Germans do not borrow in order to spend. The retail sales in March 2006 fell by 2.7% while savings rose from 9.2% in 2000 to 11% in 2005–2006. The case study focuses on the reasons for lower consumer spending in Germany and the relation between employment, demand, inflation and GDP. The case also debates on the relation between consumption and savings and measures that could spur the German consumerism to revive the country’s economy.
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Chapter 22, “Managing A Holistic Marketing Organisation for the Long-run”, of “Marketing Management A South Asian Perspective”, Kotler Philip, Koshy Abraham, et al

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