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Home » Course Case Maps » Course Case Mapping For Human Resource Management

Course Case Mapping For Human Resource Management

One of the most often heard and quoted cliches in management is : 'People are the biggest and the most valuable resource. Manage it well to Manage Your Wellbeing'. It pays off to nurture human resources, after all. What it takes to manage human rersources? Should they be managed or should they be engaged? For human resources to be highly engaged, they should firstly be managed. How to manage resources? It starts obviously from selecting the right talent. What is "right" after all? Every job in every business and industry has the right talent quotient. Once the right talent is recruited and selected, how to engage them in the best possible way? How to assess their performance? How to retain the best talent? How to reward them? Human Resources Management course addresses all these and several other related questions. IBSCDC's Human Resource Management (HRM) Case Studies enables the students to answer these questions in the most effective and efficient way.

Human Resource Management Case Mapping

Chapter : Human Resource Manage- ment at Work

Chapter : Human Resource Manage- ment at Work

Detailed Syllabus: Line vs Staff Authority – Structure and Organisational Chart of HR Department. Globalisation and its Impact on HR – IT Systems and HR
Session: 1
Key Concepts: New Challenges for HR Executives (also dealing with line and staff functions), Globalisation and its Impact on HR
Case Study: The Line vs Staff Tussle at Hi-Speed Venture Technologies: Threatening the Company’s Future?
Abstracts: This case study is meant for discussing the role of HR in an organisation and triggers an interesting debate on whether functions like recruitment and performance appraisal are meant to be restricted to the HR manager or can they also be discharged by functional managers as well? The case study also deliberates on whether HR managers should only support and facilitate processes in an organisation or should they be regarded as a separate strategic function? Established in 1997, Hi-Speed Venture Technologies (HSV) was an entrepreneurial venture started by Sumant Kumar (Kumar). To make HSV a one-stop destination for the website development needs of Indian companies, Kumar hired four experienced team members with commendable professional history. Owing to the persistent efforts of Kumar and his team, HSV was catering to the website development needs of nearly 100 Indian companies by 1999. With business prospering, Kumar promoted his four team members as technical leaders and hired eight new members. He also used this opportunity to hire an HR manager, Amit Sharma (Sharma), for handling employee related issues and implementing company wide HR policies. With the growing integration of the roles and responsibilities of the HR and line managers, how should the roles and responsibilities of the former be redefined? Should Sharma only act as a facilitator at HSV?
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Introduction to Human Resource Management”, Personnel/ HumanResource Management, 3rd edition, 2008
  • he Strategic Role of Human Resource Management”, Human Resource Management, 10th edition, 2008
  • Distributing HRM Responsibilities: A Classification of Organisations”, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Chapter : Human Resource Planning (HRP)

Chapter : Human Resource Planning (HRP)

Detailed Syllabus: Definition – Need and Importance of HRP – Process of HRP – Levels and Types of HRP – Forecasting Demand for Employees – Forecasting Supply for Employees – Balancing Supply and Demand Considerations – HRP Model. Rightsizing
Session: 2
Key Concepts: Need and Importance of HRP, Rightsizing
Case Study: Merge Healthcare Incorpo- rated’s Accounting Scandal: Was the Rightsizing Right?
Abstracts: The case analyses the ethics of rightsizing decisions and the general rightsizing practices in business corporations. It specifically looks into the issues of accounting scandal and rightsizing at Merge Healthcare Incorporated (Merge). With its humble beginning in 1987 as a medical imaging technology company, Merge’s initial growth was dull. Soon, recognising the increasing interests of investors in healthcare organisations and the possibilities, it became a public company in 1998. Merge’s share value reached an all time high during 2002–2005. This led to speculations among the investors about the unfair accounting practices in the company. Merge struggled over many class action lawsuits and an independent investigation forcing the top executives to resign and the company took a deep plunge in the share market. Merge’s hard earned image deteriorated and losses started haunting the business. Merge had to cut costs and they decided to reduce the workforce. During 2006–2008, the company cut jobs thrice as part of its rightsizing programme. It was only after the third rightsizing that the company started to recover. Soon the company came out of blues, started expansion, made new acquisitions and of course started hiring. Although the company recovered, the question remains – does a company really have to undergo rightsizing to come out of the financial trouble?
    Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
  • Rightsizing the Right way”, 2001
  • How to survive Downsizing
  • Competing for the Future”, HBR, July–August 1994
  • Human Resources: “Right” sizing”, December 1st 2006

Chapter : Recruitment and Selection Process

Chapter : Recruitment and Selection Process

Detailed Syllabus: Definition and Concept of Recruitment – Factors Affecting Recruitment – Sources of Recruitment – Information Technology and HR Recruiting on the Net (e-Recruitment) – Methods and Techniques of Recruitment Selection Process-Person Job Fit – Person Organisation Fit Elements of Selection Process Steps in the Selection Procedure – Various Types of Tests – Selection Interview: Methods and Process (including reference check and medical examination) – Placement and Induction- Competency Testing Systems
Session: 3
Key Concepts:
  • Campus Recruitment

  • Case Study: Campus Recruitment of Regular MBAs vs Executive MBAs (Lateral Recruitment): Corporate Dilemmas
    Abstracts: The case study deals with the significance of lateral recruitment and campus recruitment in building a talent pool. Human resources play a crucial role in the development of a company. Companies having the right candidate, in the right position, at the right time would be well-ahead of their competitors. However, companies do face problems in choosing a suitable method of recruitment. An inappropriate one would lead to the selection of a candidate who might not be apt for thespecified post. In such a situation, all the time and money spent by the company on recruitment would be wasted.
    The case study focuses on the dilemmas faced by two companies – Wellmade Inc. (Wellmade), a white goods manufacturing company and ABC Ltd., a financial advisory – in the process of recruitment. In the case of Wellmade, the MBAs who were recruited through campus could not meet company expectations due to lack of experience. In the case of ABC Ltd., it encountered a dilemma in choosing a viable option to recruit laterals – either through campus recruitment (of executive MBAs) or through referral system?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Recruiting Sources”, Personnel/Human Resource Management,3rd edition, 2008
    Session: 4
    Key Concepts: On-line Recruitment
    Case Study: Social Networking: Threatening the Monster and Its Likes?
    Abstracts: Very contemporary in nature, this case study was written to analyse the use of social networking as a source of recruitment and also to trigger a discussion on the possibility of social networking sites becoming a formidable competitive threat to on-line recruitment sites. Over the years, Internet has gained popularity in recruitment both among employers and among job seekers. Given the popularity of job sites, in US alone, there are almost 50,000 job sites – Monster.com, Yahoo! HotJobs.com and CareerBuilder.com, being the front-runners. While job sites were one of the predominant ways of using the Internet in recruitment, the latest fad is to use social networking sites. The social networking sites gained popularity due to the advantages offered by them over and above the job sites. In the recent past, such has been the popularity of social networking sites like linkedin.com and twitter.com that the business of job sites is under threat. Their revenues have declined and they are forced to improvise their services to counter the competition. Will increasing popularity of social networking sites capture the trend from job sites? Critics believe that the popularity of the social networking sites will diminish in due course of time. Will the job sites succeed in fighting back, relegating social networking sites to the background?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Recruiting Sources”, Personnel/Human Resource Management, 3rd edition, 2008
    • A Practical Guide to Social Networks”, HBR, March 2005
    • The Changing Face of Communication: Social Networking’s Growing Influence on Telecom Providers”, 2008
    • When Job Seekers Invade Facebook”, McKinsey Quarterly, March 2009

    Chapter : Performance and Potential Appraisal

    Chapter : Performance and Potential Appraisal

    Detailed Syllabus: Concept of Performance Management and Performance Appraisal – Objectives of Performance Appraisal – The Appraisal Process – Traditional Methods and Modern Methods of Appraisal, (Including MBO, 360 Degree, Assessment Centre, Balance Scorecard, etc) – Appraisers: Manager/ Supervisor, Self, Subordinate, Peer, Team and Customer – Pitfalls in Performance Appraisal – Potential Appraisal
    Session: 5
    Key Concepts: 360 Degree and Other Performance Appraisal Methods
    Case Study: Performance Management System@TCS
    Abstracts: Established in 1968 as ‘Tata Computer Centre’, Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) was a pioneer in the Indian Information Technology (IT) arena. Despite numerous obstacles including the government interventions and rigid licensing system, the company emerged as a successful player in the country. Headquartered in Mumbai, TCS has nearly 120,000 IT professionals working in offices spread across 42 nations. Its focus on building a diverse workforce along with its healthy work environment contributed to its growing popularity. In 2007, it topped the Global Services magazine’s list of ‘100 Best Performing IT Services’ while in 2008, DataQuest ranked it as No.1 among IT service providers. The company also boasts of low attrition rates as compared to the other players in the industry. Moreover, to recognise, manage and motivate talent within the organisation, TCS has adopted a rigorous appraisal and evaluation mechanism. The company also strives to conduct a fair and objective appraisal process to ensure that employees are rewarded while non-performers are given timely feedback. However, with the growth of the company, will it be possible to keep its appraisal process away from the clutches of bureaucracy?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Performance Appraisals”, Personnel/Human Resource Management, 3rd edition, 2008
    • Performance Management and Appraisal”, Human Resource Management, 10th edition, 2008
    Session: 6
    Key Concepts: HR Scorecard
    Case Study: Sears, Roebuck and Company: Operating Performance Turnaround with HR Scorecard
    Abstracts: In the backdrop of emerging trends in HR and the changing paradigms in the role of HR from an administration to a strategic asset, the case study provides an in-depth understanding of strategic human resource management and the need and importance of implementing an HR Scorecard. By illustrating Sears as an excellent example of a retailer’s strategic focus on HR, this case study offers many intriguing issues to debate on – emerging trends in HR, the new and broader strategic role of HR, strategic influence of HR on organisational performance and the factors that led Sears to lose market to competitors. It also discusses about the intricacies of implementing an operational turnaround under the able leadership of Arthur C. Martinez and sustainability of such an approach.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • The HR Scorecard : Linking People, Strategy, and Performance, HBS Press, February 28th 2001
    • Developing and Implementing a Relationship Strategy”, Relationship Marketing – Creating Stakeholder Value, Revised edition, October 2002
    • Strategic Human Resource Management Measures: Key Linkages and the PeopleVantage Model”, 1998

    Chapter : Employee Training and Manage- ment Develop- ment

    Chapter : Employee Training and Manage- ment Develop- ment

    Detailed Syllabus: Importance and Objectives – Distinction between Training and Development – Principle of Learning – e-Learning, Competency Mapping – Assessment Center, Types of Training and Development – Training Need Analysis – Systematic Approach to Training and Development – Evaluation of Training
    Session: 7
    Key Concepts: Competency Mapping
    Case Study: Competency Mapping at ‘The Kolkata Glory’
    Abstracts: The market place of the 21st century is fraught with numerous challenges. As competition increases day by day, there is tremendous pressure on organisations to exploit their resources to the maximum to achieve success. Among others, the human resource is also under pressure as organisations expect their employees to work to their highest potential. Under such circumstances, competency mapping can be of help both for the employer and the employee. This case study was written to develop an understanding on the concept of competency mapping. What is competency mapping? Why should companies employ competency mapping? Competency mapping helps companies achieve competitive advantage by identifying and bridging the gap between the competencies that an employee possesses and the competencies that he is expected to have to perform the job efficiently. For instance, the hotel industry (a labour-intensive industry) needs constant upgradation of competencies to remain competitive. Competency mapping gains significance under such circumstances. However, it is debatable if competency mapping can help achieve competitive advantage across various industries. Nevertheless, competency mapping comes across as an important HR tool as seen in the case of ‘The Kolkata Glory’, a 5-star hotel where competency mapping was carried out for the concierge.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Job Analysis”, Human Resource Management, 10th edition, 2008
    • Competency Based Management: A Review of Systems and Approaches”, Information Management & Computer Security, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2006
    • Competencies for a Career in the Hospitality Industry: An Indian Perspective”, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2006
    • Influencing Performance Improvement Using Skill Charting”, Journal of European Industrial Training, 2003
    Session: 8
    Key Concepts: Training and Development
    Case Study: Executive Brief with Anjali Mukherjee, Training Leader, Transcend Communications Ltd.
    Abstracts: This video case study triggers an interesting discussion regarding the training function, which has emerged as an integral part of every organisation. This case study is meant for discussing the concepts of training and development in the Human Resource Management course. With regard to the same, real-time training problems faced by an experienced executive are showcased through this video.As a training manager with a reputed BPO firm, Anjali Mukherjee (Anjali) and her team were faced with the challenge of designing and imparting training in the voice-based business arena. Being a new business vertical, both for the company and for the Indian BPO industry, Anjali was apprehensive and uncertain about treading this path. Over the years, the intensifying competition, attitudinal clash with the business heads and the shrinking talent pool added to the woes of Anjali and her training team. With the company expecting her team to impart effective training in minimal time what measures should Anjali and her team take?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Employee Training and Management Development”, Personnel/Human Resource Management, 3rd edition, Prentice-Hall Inc.,1998
    • The Other End of the Line, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures and Hyde Park Entertainment with Adlabs Films (Producer – Ashok Amritraj, Director – James Dodson), 2008
    Session: 9
    Key Concepts: Grooming Future Leaders
    Case Study: Grooming Next-Generation Leaders: The Infosys Way
    Abstracts: This case study deals with the growing significance of grooming future leaders in organisations. Efficient leaders are essential to motivate the employees and steer them towards a particular goal. Leaders are also crucial in coming up with innovative ideas that would benefit the organisation. Realising the requisite, most of the organisations are grooming their potential employees as future leaders. This is an advantage to the companies in one way as the leadership training and development would bring down the attrition rate in the companies. Infosys is one such company which benefited by banking on the concept to a large extent. Infosys has also established a leadership institute exclusively for grooming its employees as future leaders. The Infosys style of grooming its future leaders has stood as a benchmark for other companies as well. However, sceptics inquire to what extent companies can benefit from grooming future leaders. However, the big question is what would be the nature of leadership required for a company like Infosys which belongs to the IT industry?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Training and Development”, Human Resource Management, 10th edition, 2008
    Session: 10
    Key Concepts: Leadership Development (Indian Scenario)
    Case Study: Engaging the India Inc.: The Young Brigade Leads the Way
    Abstracts: This case study explores the evolution of Indian executive career and the changing role of a CEO in the dynamic and less predictable business environment. Quoting examples from top Indian companies – both manufacturing and service sectors – this case study provides an overview on the new age CEO, the roles and responsibilities and shows how younger generation can better lead the Indian corporate entities. It delves into many issues to debate on: whether the young CEOs have the requisite experience and exposure to lead an organisation at the helm, the reasons for today’s organisations looking for relatively younger generation to take charge and whether age and experience count any longer.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • What Only the CEO Can Do”, HBR, May 2009

    Chapter : Managing Careers

    Chapter : Managing Careers

    Detailed Syllabus: Concept – Career Stages – Career Anchors Career Development Cycle – Benefits of Career Planning to Individual as well as Organisation – Internal Mobility: Promotions, Transfers, Separation and Succession Planning, Downshifting.
    Session: 11
    Key Concepts:
  • Separation and Succession Planning

  • Case Study: Leadership Conundrum: Nike after Knight
    Abstracts: In December 2004, Phil Knight (Knight), the legendary Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Nike, stepped down to hand over the reins (for the third time) to William D. Perez (Perez). Although Knight had stepped down twice in the past, Nike’s dismal performance forced him to return as the CEO on both the occasions. Knight created a unique organisational culture at Nike where he neither gave guidance to his managers nor questioned them about the product details. Knight has always been one of the unique of the Fortune 500 CEOs, a man who seems to embody exactly the opposite of what his creation extols.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Career Development”, Personnel/Human Resource Management, 3rd edition, 2008
    • The CEO’s Real Legacy”, HBR, November 2004
    • What Becomes an Icon Most?”, HBR, March 2003
    • The Successor’s Dilemma”, HBR, November-December 1999
    • CEOs @ Nike: Succession Guaranteed?”, IBSCDC, 2006
    • Are Leaders Portable?”, HBR, May 2006
    Session: 12
    Key Concepts:
  • Women as Business Leaders

  • Case Study: Chanda Kochhar as the CEO of ICICI Bank: Can She Manage the Mandate?
    Abstracts: In the male-dominated world of Indian financial institutions, are women at the helm still a rarity? At the dawn of the new millennium, India celebrates the remarkable progress of women in business. Women made great strides in boardrooms and courtrooms, on screen and in society and are regularly featured on the cover pages of business magazines. Indian women today attack the so-called glass ceiling to emerge at the top of the corporate ladder. No other institution is epochal to this trend than ICICI bank. The leading private sector bank of the country is never bereft of women in senior management. Beginning with Lalita Gupte, the group has many women executives – Kalpana Morparia, Shikha Sharma, Chanda Kochhar (Kochhar) and Renuka Ramnath. Though the legendary CEO, K.V. Kamath groomed the next generation leaders – Vishakha Mulye and Madhabi Puri-Buch, it is Kochhar who made news as his successor. In the backdrop of the changing role of women in the Indian corporate sector, this case study presents Kochhar’s new role as the managing director and CEO of ICICI Bank. Highlighting Kochhar’s invaluable contributions to the evolution and growth of the company, the case study delves into her stint in successfully running various divisions of the bank and her leadership qualities in handling banking operations during tough times. It offers many intriguing issues to debate on – whether Kochhar is the right choice to succeed K.V. Kamath, her capabilities that gave her edge over other contenders, role of women in business, particularly in sectors like banking and finance and abilities of women vs men in leading organisations.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • A Modest Manifesto for Shattering the Glass Ceiling”, HBR, January–February 2000
    • Women and the Vision Thing”, HBR, January 2009
    Session: 13
    Key Concepts:
  • Managing Midlife Crisis

  • Case Study: Midlife Career: Career Stages and Managing Confusions
    Abstracts: Narrating illustrations of five Indian corporate executives, this case study deals with the various factors that influence one’s midlife career decisions and how those factors determine individuals’ ability to either turn it into an opportunity for new challenges and reinvention or create a crisis. Since every individual goes through this midlife transition at some point of his/her life, it needs to be identified and dealt with cautiously. For some, it is a period of frustration, confusion and alienation and for others, a time for self- discovery, new direction and fresh beginnings. The case study offers many intriguing issues to debate on: What is midlife transition? Why is it termed a crisis? Can it be an opportunity for inner growth and reassessment of life’s priorities? What are the implications of mid-career frustrations on individuals (personal and professional lives) and organisations? How can they preempt or overcome a crisis during mid-career?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • “Managing Middlescence”, HBR OnPoint, March 2006
    • “The Existential Necessity of Midlife Change”, HBR, February 2008
    • “Midlife Crisis”, Effective Executive, February 2009

    Chapter : Employee Relation and Collective Bargaining

    Chapter : Employee Relation and Collective Bargaining

    Detailed Syllabus: Concept and Purpose – Industrial Relations – Collective Bargaining – Types – Process Pre-requisites – Issues Involved Worker Participation in Management, Trade Unions, Trade Union Act, Industrial Disputes Act, Factories Act, Workmen’s Compensation Act.
    Session: 14
    Key Concepts: Concept and Purpose of Industrial Relations, Trade Union Act, Industrial Disputes Act, Factories Act, Workmen’s Compensation Act
    Case Study: Industrial Relations in Tamil Nadu: Tarnishing the Investor- friendly Image?
    Abstracts: Tamil Nadu was among the few states which worked hard to make the state an investment destination in the post-liberalisation era of Indian economy. Involving bureaucratic bodies aimed at industrial development and bringing about transparency in policies, Tamil Nadu’s industrial development gained momentum. Soon it became home to many domestic and international business majors, who appreciated the amicable labour relations in the State. But, Tamil Nadu’s industrial relations took a severe hit as there was a sudden surge of labour disputes in the state. Four major disputes that involved industrial giants were severe enough to damage the investor-friendly image of the state. With the blame game between the unions and companies continuing, the government is worried about the future investments. It is high time to understand that the strength of industrial relations would directly affect the economic growth of the state. While labour law reforms and amendments of major acts are under consideration, the future investment scenario might become bleak in Tamil Nadu. Among the partners, who is to be held responsible if the economic future of the state is affected; the government, the managements or the unions?The case study analyses the effects of labour disputes on economy and growth of a state. Discussing the growth strategies of Tamil Nadu, the case analyses the reasons for labour disputes in Tamil Nadu. Discussing four major labour disputes in 2009, the case discusses the tarnished image of Tamil Nadu. The perplexing labour laws in the state and the need of a collaborative action from the partners of industrial development have also been discussed.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining”, Human Resource Management, 10th edition, 2008
    • "Labor Relations", Personnel/ Human Resource Management, 3rd edition, 2008
    Session: 15
    Key Concepts: Collective Bargaining
    Case Study: Collective Bargaining at NBA: Who Scores the Basket?
    Abstracts: National Basketball Association (NBA) established in 1949 and a constellation of 30 independent teams, was one of the most successfully run professional sports organisations in the world. It still is, except for the losses that few of its 30 teams are making. The National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) and NBA, better known as The Union and The League, had fought over the issue of revenue sharing between NBPA and NBA, most of the times. After the lockouts and strikes in 1990s, which resulted in the loss of millions of dollars, both NBA and NBPA had been very careful in maintaining a good relationship. To negotiate the revenue sharing, NBPA continuously engaged in collective bargaining with NBA and the decisions were made legal through Collective Bargaining Agreements (CBA). The negotiation process between NBA and NBPA resulted in a major success with the CBA of 1999. In 2005 too, NBA and NBPA avoided another lockout by signing another CBA. However, the global recession of 2008 affected the sports business too, with revenues spiralling down landing the smaller teams of the league in a financial catastrophe. With owners refusing to extend the current CBA, expiring in 2011, even for another year, both sides have already started talks regarding the possibility of a new CBA. Though both the NBA and the NBPA are positive about reaching an amicable solution, some experts opine that another lockout is looming over the NBA.The case discusses collective bargaining and its use in NBA. It also discusses whether collective bargaining can affect the interests of the organisation in a negative way. The case also poses a question – Can collective bargaining be effectively used across organisations as a negotiation tool to protect employee interests?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Collective Bargaining: A Fundamental Principle, a Right, a Convention”, 1999
    • Managing People in Sports Organisation”, 2008
    • Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining”, Human Resource Management, 10th edition, 2008
    • Labor Relations”, Personnel/ Human Resource Management, 3rd edition, 2008

    Chapter : Grievance Handling

    Chapter : Grievance Handling

    Detailed Syllabus: Definition of Grievance – Causes/Sources of Grievances – Grievance Redressal Machinery – Model Grievance Procedure – Legislative Aspects of the Grievance Redressal Procedure in India. Domestic Enquiry, Discipline and Disciplinary Actions – Dismissal and Discharge of an Employee – Trade Unions.
    Session: 16
    Key Concepts: Trade Unions
    Case Study: Jet Airways’ Labour Dispute: Trade Unions and India’s Labour Conundrum
    Abstracts: Disputes in domestic and multinational companies in India are on a rise since 2008. It is not sure whether the labour unrest is here to stay or it is just a side effect of the toppled economy. Citing a plethora of faults with employers, the labour community, represented by various organisations ranging from local trade unions to officers’ associations continuously engaged themselves in strikes and protests. Indian economy which is about to lean heavily on service sector would get affected if the problem is not solved soon. While Jet Airways’ pilots went on a strike for 5 days, there were millions of passengers who landed up in trouble. The results? Bad reputation for both – the company and the employees plus great monetary loss. While India’s age old labour laws stand safeguarding the interests of the supposedly less powerful ‘employee’ community with a few amendments over the years, ironically, the labour unrest is growing in the country. Is it time to modify India’s labour laws? Who is on the wrong side, employees or employers? The case study deals with the labour laws in India and their effect and influence in the modern day trade unions and businesses. Explaining the case of Jet Airways labour dispute in 2009, the case brings in the issues of increasing labour discontent and makes a case for why a major reform in labour legislations is required.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining”, Human Resource Management, 10th edition, 2008
    • Labor Relations”, Personnel/ Human Resource Management, 3rd Edition, 2008
    • Contemporary Issues on Labour Law Reforms in India”, 2007
    • Recognition of a Trade Union
    • An Overview of the Industrial Dispute and Settlement Machinery
    • Recession and Rising Relevance of Section 25 F, Industrial Disputes Act, 1947
    Session: 17
    Key Concepts: Work Life Balance
    Case Study: Employees As Brands: The Case of Google
    Abstracts: This case is written primarily to raise an interesting argument over a simple, yet, thought provoking concept – how can human resources be leveraged as a source of competitive advantage? Illustrated through the example of Google, this case raises many intriguing issues. In the span of a decade, Google has emerged as a technological powerhouse with two extraordinary innovations, ‘search’ and ‘AdWords’, to its credit. The company attributes this enviable rise to glory to its most valued assets – the Google employees. Since its inception, the company has constantly hired only the best talent in the industry, preferring creativity to work experience. Striving to attract and retain bright and inspiring employees, Google focused on motivating its employees by creating a challenging yet fun-filled work environment coupled with a wide array of perks ranging from free food and a gym to employee stock options. Additionally, to foster innovativeness, Google has adopted the ‘70/20/10’ model, to encourage Googlers to spend 20% of their work time on a project of their choice. These efforts paid off and Google emerged as the most sought after place to work for two consecutive years (2007 and 2008). However, can a company that has focused on small teams and individual interaction with all employees cope up with the same when its meteoric climb to success has captured the interest of many competitors? The appreciation of Google’s achievements has been accompanied by increasing apprehensions about the long-term sustainability of Google’s informal and fun-filled culture. Whether Google’s success is a result of its much hyped work culture or vice versa, continues to be an unresolved enigma.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Human Resource Management in the Future”, Personnel/Human Resource Management, 3rd edition, 2008
    • The Google Enigma”, s+b “10 Reasons to Design a Better Corporate Culture”, HBS Working Knowledge
    • Perk Place: The Benefits Offered by Google and Others May Be Grand, but They’re All Business”, Knowledge@Wharton, March 21st 2007

    Chapter : Quality of Work Life – Emerging Trends

    Chapter : Quality of Work Life – Emerging Trends

    Detailed Syllabus: The Concept of Quality of Work Life (QWL) – Strategies for Improving QWL, Family Integration Processes
    Session: 18
    Key Concepts: Strategies for Improving Quality of Work Life
    Case Study: Health Hazards Battles of IBM
    Abstracts: Since the late 1990s, IBM had been rattled by legal suits filed by its former employees in California and New York, USA. Most of the plaintiffs sued IBM on the grounds that IBM had knowingly exposed them to harmful chemicals, which had caused severe health problems. IBM defended itself by stating that the health problems of its former employees could have been due to many other reasons as there had been no definite proof that employees in the semiconductor industry were prone to health problems only because of the chemicals used in the industry.

    Chapter : Emerging (Recent) Trends in Human Resource Manage- ment

    Chapter : Emerging (Recent) Trends in Human Resource Manage- ment

    Detailed Syllabus: Talent Management – PCMM – Entrepreneurship (Intrapreneurship), QWL, E-HRM, GHRM, QHRM
    Session: 19
    Key Concepts: Talent Management
    Case Study: Mahindra Satyam’s Virtual Pool Program (VPP): Managing Talent in a Downturn?
    Abstracts: Triggered by subprime mortgage crisis, US Financial Crisis (2008) resulted in engulfing world economy with sudden downfall in all the major economic indicators leading to unprecedented layoffs. Amidst these layoffs, Satyam Computer Services Ltd., was hit by an internal financial scam, aggravating its situation more than any other Indian IT company. As the future of the company hung in a dilemma, Tech Mahindra bought a controlling stake in the organisation and declared that it had to solve the problem of surplus workforce at Satyam which ranged between 7,000–10,000 associates. Amidst speculations of massive job losses, the company announced an innovative scheme – the Virtual Pool Program (VPP) – to address the issue of surplus workforce while at the same time retaining talent. However, can VPP be called as an effective talent management strategy amidst downturn? VPP has also been called as an indirect way of laying-off people.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Talent Management for the Twenty-First Century”, HBR, March 2008
    • Managing Talent in Uncertain Times”, Accenture, 2009
    • Growing Talent As If Your Business Depended on It”, HBR, October 2005
    • Make Your Company A Talent Factory”, HBR, June 2007
    Session: 20
    Key Concepts: Intrapreneur- ship
    Case Study: N. Chandra-sekaran@TCS: Leadership with Intra-preneurship
    Abstracts: In 2009, Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), the Indian IT giant, under the newly appointed CEO and managing director, Natarajan Chandrasekaran, disaggregated the colossal TCS into 23 smaller business units. Each unit was to have its own CEO, CFO and an HR head and was to run as an independent company under the TCS banner. What TCS has attempted is corporate entrepreneurship or intrapreneurship. While entrepreneurship is widely known, intrapreneurship is its lesser known cousin. The case study delves deep into the concept of intrapreneurship and provides an opportunity to understand the concept. There are examples of successful intrapreneurial ventures from across the globe – the Post-It Notes, Sony PlayStations, Java Programming Language and HCL Comnet to name a few. While intrapreneurship has blossomed at several organisations, there have been instances when people have left their jobs at large organisations to start their own entrepreneurial ventures that proved to be successful. One is made to wonder if the organisations would have gained from these ventures had they been nurtured in-house. What is the significance of intrapreneurship for organisations? Considering the case of TCS, the intrapreneurial move is debatable as TCS for long has been a managerial organisation and not an entrepreneurial one. Was it the right time for TCS to go intrapreneurial? When should an organisation nurture intrapreneurship and for how long the venture should be fostered before being spun-off as a separate business entity?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Human Resource Management in the Future”, Personnel/Human Resource Management, 3rd Edition, 2008
    • An Interactive Model of the Corporate Entrepreneurship Process”, Winter 1993
    • Gateways to Intrapreneurship”, January/February 2006
    • Innovation Through Intrapreneurship: The Road Less Travelled”, January–March 2006
    • Intrapreneurial Levers in Cultivating Value-innovative Mental Space in Indian Corporations”, January–March 2006
    • Intrapreneurship: Leveraging Organisational Talent”, November 2008
    • Developing an Intrapreneurial Assessment Instrument For An Effective Corporate Entrepreneurial Environment”, 1990
    Session: 21
    Key Concepts: Entrapreneur- ship
    Case Study: New Age Indian Entrepreneurs
    Abstracts: This case study is meant for discussing the evolution of entrepreneurship in India and the emergence and growth of the ‘New Age Indian Entrepreneur’. Since time immemorial, the Indian business segment has been dominated by family-run businesses, with most of them hailing from traditional, money-lending or trading communities, known for their sharp business acumen. Moreover, entrepreneurship in the Indian scenario has long been associated with the ‘Tatas’, ‘Birlas’ or ‘Ambanis’. However, with many first-generation entrepreneurs bombarding the Indian business sector in the recent years, this trend has taken a back seat. Although these legendary business houses have played a major role in the country’s business scenario, majority of the Indian start-ups in the recent past, are the brainchild of first-generation, middle-class entrepreneurs. Dictating professions by means of caste and social strata has become a matter of the past. The economic reforms and liberalisation have rekindled the latent entrepreneurial streak of the Indian people, making entrepreneurship a desired choice of career. Further, easy access to resources and growing social acceptance has encouraged many Indians to jump on to the entrepreneurship bandwagon. Driven by the aim of creating ventures based on feasible business models and backed by innovative ideas, these new entrepreneurs are not leaving any stone unturned. Nevertheless, this sudden splurge in entrepreneurship has also given rise to many apprehensions. Are these entrepreneurs dedicated towards building world-class companies which shall weave long-term success stories? How many of these entrepreneurs will be able to make a mark like the legendary business firms of the Tatas and Birlas?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Modern India”, HBS, May 5th 1997
    • Global Entrepreneurship Monitor”, 1999
    • Level 5 Leadership: The Triumph of Humility and Fierce Resolve”, HBR, January 2001
    • Global Entrepreneurship Monitor 2008 Executive Report
    Session: 22
    Key Concepts: Virtual Teams and Telecommuting
    Case Study: Telecommuting: A Perk or Prerequisite?
    Abstracts: Is telecommuting an asset or a liability for organisations? ‘It depends’, is the typical answer. This case study enables an engaging discussion on this aspect. Also, what can be covered is a broader discussion on whether telecommuting should be looked at as a corporate strategy or an HR strategy. It is believed that by the end of 2009, almost 27.5% of workers in the US would be telecommuting. While the practice has become quite common in the west, it is still in its nascent stage in India. Several factors such as traffic congestions, environmental concerns and the call for work-life balance have necessitated the adoption of telecommuting practices. Factors such as technological advancements have also spurred the growth of telecommuting. However, what are the implications of telecommuting for organisations and employees? When does telecommuting as an HR practice make economic sense to organisations? The dilemma presented in the case is about the impact of telecommuting on organisational and employee productivity and the career prospects of telecommuters. It also triggers a debate on the feasibility of practicing telecommuting across various industries.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Human Resource Management in the Future”, Personnel/Human Resource Management, 3rd edition, 2008
    • Improving Quality of Life Through Telecommuting”, January 2009
    • Cross-Cultural Telecommuting Evaluation in Mexico and the United States”, 2003
    • Effectively Leading and Managing A Virtual Team”, The Business Review, Cambridge, Summer 2009
    Session: 23
    Key Concepts: Employee Engagement
    Case Study: Employee Engagement: Employer and Employee's Delight
    Abstracts: The million-dollar question for every employer is how to get every employee engaged and rally them around a common vision. Employee engagement is a critical factor that contributes for employer-employee alignment, which finally leads to increased productivity. However, instilling a ‘sense of belongingness’ in its employees is not an easy feat for any organisation. An engaged employee is an asset for the organisation that in turn tries to foster employee engagement or belongingness for a company in the employee. The case study deals with questions like what inspires an employee to be engaged in his/her work. Is there a human resource perspective to motivate employees for such commitment? What is the difference between an engaged employee and a committed employee or are the two same? Should there be a difference between the HR practices to retain an employee and the HR practices to engage an employee? Even if the company intends to engage what would be their limitations in doing so?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Employee Disengagement: Is there Evidence of a Growing Problem?”, Emerald Group of Publishing Limited, 2006
    • Employee Engagement: The Key To Realizing Competitive Advantage
    • Employee Engagement and Commitment
    • ANZ Bank: Breaking out of the Mould”, November 29th 2005
    • 2003 Towers Perrin Talent Report: Understanding what drives Employee Engagement
    • Leadership, Culture and Employee Engagement: Do CEOs and Executives Actually get it?”, June 30th 2004
    • The Influence of Leadership on Employee Engagement”, February 14th 2008
    • Four Levels of Employee Engagement”, February 14th 2009
    • Organisational Leadership To Engage Employees”, June 12th 2009
    Session: 24
    Key Concepts: Glass Ceiling in the Indian Business Arena
    Case Study: Indian Women in Banking Industry: Breaking Glass Ceilings?
    Abstracts: The dawn of the year 2009 presented an occasion to celebrate for India as it experienced a magnificent growth by women in the banking sector. It is rightly said, ‘To awaken people, it is the woman who must be awakened. Once she is on the move, the family moves, the village moves and the nation moves’. The purpose of this case study is to understand the paradigm shifts of India Inc.’s gender composition and how Indian women are carving a niche in the corporate world. From ancient times, women have held respectable position in the society, particularly in the Indian scenario. But unfortunately, their potential was underestimated since they were limited to domestic duties and were relegated in society. With the introduction of economic reforms in 1990s, the facet changed; women started stepping into the corporate world and excelled in their fields or showcased their talent. Though the women participation in labour force has increased, they are still striving to find considerable position at the top levels of organisational structure. In the male-dominated banking industry, Chanda Kochhar, Shikha Sharma, Naina Lal Kidwai and Manisha Girotra are some of the successful women executives who proved their mettle. Further, the case study provides a rich discussion on – should women lead all the industries, which are crucial to an economy, in particular, banking industry? Do women make better bankers?
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • A business case for women”, The McKinsey Quarterly, September 2008
    • Centered Leadership: How talented women thrive”, The McKinsey Quarterly, 2008
    • Do Women Lack Ambition?”, HBR, April 2004
    Session: 25
    Key Concepts: Generation Gap
    Case Study: Age Diversity at Ashok Leyland Ltd.: Narrowing the Generation Gap
    Abstracts: The case discusses the age diversity issues at Ashok Leyland Limited (ALL), India’s second largest commercial vehicle manufacturers. The case can be used to discuss the topics of generational differences and necessity of its effective management. ALL is a company with a longstanding history in India’s industrial development. Started as an establishment aimed at industrial development of India, the group grew into the manufacturers of the Heavy Commercial Vehicles (HCV). The company’s growth, though slow, was marked by innovations. To compete with the foreign commercial vehicle manufacturers and stay fit in the market, the company decided to recruit more youngsters. Soon, 40% of ALL’s workforce constituted of people less than 35 years of age. But the increasing attrition rate of its younger employees puzzled ALL. Searching for the reason, ALL found out that the younger employees were undergoing a cultural shock. The system which revolved over experience was in need of change. Negligence in management of age diversity can spell serious troubles in an organisation. With more and more youngsters entering the workforce, managing age diversity has become a serious responsibility of managements across the globe.
      Background Reading/ Additional Reading:
    • Diversity as Strategy
    • Making Differences Matter: A New Paradigm for Managing Diversity

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      Course Pack contains
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    • 24 Teaching Notes
    • 1 Video Case Study (Executive Brief)

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